Updated 02.07.2018

Hazardous biological substances

 

 


List of controlled human pathogens and toxins

(Listed in Annex 1 to Executive Order no. 981 of 15 October 2009 with subsequent amendments)

Viruses

 a. Viruses, whether natural, enhanced or modified, in the form of isolated live cultures or of materials, including living materials which are intentionally inoculated or contaminated with such cultures, as follows:

1. Andes virus
2. Chapare virus
3. Chikungunya virus
4. Choclo virus
5. Dobrava-Belgrade virus
6. Ebola virus
7. Tick-borne encephalitis virus (Far Eastern subtype)
8. Guanarito virus
9. Yellow fever virus
10. Hantaan virus
11. Hendra virus (Equine morbillivirus)
12. Japanese encephalitis virus
13. Junin virus
14. Congo-Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus
15. Kyasanur Forest virus
16. Laguna Negra virus
17. Lassa fever virus
18. Louping ill virus
19. Lujo virus
20. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus
21. Machupo virus
22. Marburg virus
23. Monkey pox virus
24. Murray Valley encephalitis virus
25. Nipah virus
26. Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus
27. Oropouche virus
28. Powassan virus
29. Rabies virus and all other members of the Lyssavirus genus
30. Rift Valley fever virus
31. Rocio virus
32. Sabia virus
33. Seoul virus
34. Sin nombre virus
35. St Louis encephalitis virus
36. Variola virus
37. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus
38. Western equine encephalitis virus
39. Eastern equine encephalitis virus

 

Bacteria

1. Bacillus anthracis
2. Brucella abortus
3. Brucella melitensis
4. Brucella suis
5. Burkholderia mallei (Pseudomonas mallei)
6. Burkholderia pseudomallei (Pseudomonas pseudomallei)
7. Chlamydophila psittaci (formerly known as Chlamydia psittaci)
8. Clostridium argentinense (formerly known as Clostridium botulinum Type G), botulinum neurotoxin producing strains
9. Clostridium baratii, botulinum neurotoxin producing strains
10. Clostridium botulinum
11. Clostridium butyricum, botulinum neurotoxin producing strains
12. Clostridium perfringens, epsilon toxin producing types
13. Coxiella burnetii
14. Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) of serogroups O26, O45, O103, O104, O111, O121, O145, O157, and other shiga toxin producing serogroups
15. Francisella tularensis
16. Rickettsia prowazekii
17. Salmonella typhi
18. Shigella dysenteriae
19. Vibrio cholerae
20. Yersinia pestis

Note: Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is also known as enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) or verocytotoxin producing E. coli (VTEC).

 

Toxins

1. Abrin
2. Aflatoxins
3. Botulinum toxins
4. Clostridium perfringens alpha, beta 1, beta 2, epsilon and iota toxins
5. Conotoxins
6. Diacetoxyscirpenol toxin
7. HT-2 toxin
8. Cholera toxin
9. Microcystin (Cyanoginosin)
10. Modeccin
11. Ricin
12. Saxitoxin
13. Shiga toxin
14. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin, hemolysin alpha toxin, and toxic shock syndrome toxin (formerly known as Staphylococcus enterotoxin F)
15. T-2 toxin
16. Tetrodotoxin
17. Verotoxin and shiga-like ribosome inactivating proteins
18. Viscum Album Lectin 1 (Viscumin)
19. Volkensin

Note 1: This control excludes botulinum toxins and conotoxins in product form meeting all of the following criteria:
1) Are pharmaceutical formulations designed for human administration in the treatment of medical conditions;
2) Are pre-packaged for distribution as medical products; and
3) Are authorised by a state authority to be marketed as medical products.

Note 2: This control excludes vaccines and immunotoxins.

 

Fungi

e. Fungi, whether natural, enhanced or modified, either in the form of isolated live cultures or as material, including living material, which has been deliberately inoculated or contaminated with such cultures, as follows:


1. Coccidioides immitis
2. Coccidioides posadasii

 

 


List of controlled animal pathogens 

 

(Listed in Annex 1 to Executive Order no. 803 of 22 June 2016)

Viruses

A. Viruses, whether they are natural, enhanced or modified, either in the form of isolated living cultures or in the form of material that includes living material that has been deliberately inoculated or contaminated with such cultures, as follows:

  1. African horse sickness virus
  2. African swine fever virus
  3. Avian influenza viruses*
  4. Bluetongue virus
  5. Foot and mouth disease virus
  6. Goat pox virus
  7. Porcine herpes virus (Aujeszky's disease.
  8. Swine fever virus (Hog Cholera virus.
  9. Lumpy Skin Disease virus
  10. Newcastle disease virus
  11. Sheep and goat plague
  12. Enterovirus type 9 in swine (swine vesicular disease virus.
  13.  Rabies virus and all other members of the Lyssavirus family
  14. Rinderpest virus
  15. Sheep pox virus
  16. Teschovirus A
  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus

 

Bacteria

B. Bacteria, whether natural, enhanced or modified, either in the form of isolated live cultures or as materials, including living materials, which are deliberately inoculated or contaminated with such cultures, as follows:

  1. 1. Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (type F38.
    2. Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides SC (small colony biotype.

 


*Avian influenza viruses, which are:

a. uncharacterised, or
b. defined in Annex I(2. to Directive 2005/94/EC (OJ L 10, 1412006, p 16. as a strong pathogen as follows:
i. Type A virus with an intravenous pathogenicity index in six-week old chickens greater than 12, or
ii. Type A virus of subtype H5 or H7 with genome sequences codifying for multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site of the haemagglutinin molecule similar to that observed for other HPAI viruses, indicating that the haemagglutinin molecule can be cleaved by a host ubiquitous protease

Contact us

Centre for Biosecurity and Biopreparedness 
Statens Serum Institut

5 Artillerivej
DK-2300 Copenhagen S

Telefon: +45 32688127
Email: cbb@ssi.dk